November 24, 2013

Tissue Paper Turkeys

Tissue Paper Turkeys

This colorful little turkey was made by one of my Explorer/Toddler art students (ages 12-24 months) at Cornerstone Child Development Center.  All he needed were glue and two kinds of paper: tissue paper and construction paper.  




Procedure:



Introducing the Lesson



  • Turkeys are a fun art project to do with little artists this time of year, but how many 12-24 month olds, who live in a big city, have seen a live turkey?  Not many, I think. So I found a You Tube Video entitled Best Live Turkey Footage, which really was the best footage on the web.  I showed the video to the kids before we began the project. 


Note:  I've shown this turkey video to all my classes at Cornerstone, and to little-arty-pants (Calvin), and I've posted it no less than four times on this blog.  By now, my whole world has seen this turkey video.

















Teaching the Lesson





  • Everybody started with a precut circle for the turkey's head.  We named the shape and noted that a circle goes 'round and around'.  








  • Then the children added the eyes and beak.  I put glue on the back and the children placed their eyes/beak where they wanted to.  They pat-pat-patted to be sure everything was stuck on.






  • It was time to glue on the tissue paper feathers.  I squeezed glue onto a half circle of white construction paper and handed each child a bowl of tissue paper cut into very, very small pieces.







  • I demonstrated how to pinch a few pieces and place them on the half circle.  The children caught on quickly.







  • Every now and then someone got too sticky, which made it impossible to get the tissue paper off their fingers.  A few swipes with a wet cloth remedied the situation, and they were ready to go again.









  • Finally it was time to glue the head on top of the tissue paper feathers.







  • They pat-pat-patted the head into place.







  • And then they were done.  What do you think?  Pretty good, I'd say.









Concepts Explored:

  • shape recognition
  • animal identification
  • manual dexterity development
  • listening/following directions





Do you have a comment or a suggestion?  I'd love to hear from you.





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